About Us

Since 2005 the Desert Fish Habitat Partnership has worked with partners throughout the United States to conserve native desert fishes by restoring, protecting, and enhancing their habitats.  
Bonytail Chub_USFWS_1
Bonytail Chub_USFWS_1
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Adult bluehead sucker from the Little Colorado River #littlecoloradoriver #blueheadsucker #azbeauty
Adult bluehead sucker from the Little Colorado River #littlecoloradoriver #blueheadsucker #azbeauty
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Flannelmouth sucker #septembertravels #littlecoloradoriver #welovenativefishes
Flannelmouth sucker #septembertravels #littlecoloradoriver #welovenativefishes

One of many species of native pupfish found throughout the Southwestern U.S.

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Ash Meadows Speckled Dace_Ryan Hagerty_U
Ash Meadows Speckled Dace_Ryan Hagerty_U
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The Desert Fish Habitat Partnership (DFHP) seeks to address fish and habitat issues over a broad geographic area that encompasses the entirety of the Great Basin and Mohave deserts, and those por­tions of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts that lie within the United States.

 

The benefits of aquatic habitat conservation extend beyond desert fishes to include humans and other animal and plant species.

Riparian habitats that depend on surface water not only support a significant number of terrestrial and avian species identified as priority conservation species in state wildlife action plans, but also function to store water that supplements groundwater recharge.

 

The declining status of so many desert fishes highlights the importance of

preserving these aquatic habitats so that water is available not only for the native fish, but also for future generations of humans.

 

The Partnership plays an important role in conserving water in the West for future generations.