ADDRESS

 

Arizona FWCO

P.O. Box 39

Pinetop, AZ 85935

stephanie_vail-muse@fws.gov

Tel: 928-338-4288 ext. 26

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©  2016 Desert Fish Habitat Partnership

2015 Projects

Restoration of the Five Springs Complex at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, NV

The Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) supports the only endemic population of the critically endangered Ash Meadows Amargosa Pupfish and the Ash Meadows Speckled Dace in the world. In an effort to address the direct threats of small population size, genetic isolation, and to improve aquatic habitat conditions the Ash Meadows NWR, the Nevada Department of Wildlife, and numerous other partners are working together to restore natural hydrologic connectivity between the Five Springs complex and downstream habitats.

 

This project removed nonnative species and restored the natural historic floods that were hindered by a road and fallow field. This restoration has benefited the Ash Meadows Amargosa Pupfish, the Ash Meadows Speckled Dace, and numerous other plant and animal species by improved fish passage and connectivity through the removal of barriers and impoundments, yielding increased genetic exchange for the pupfish, and increasing the available habitat for both the pupfish and the speckled dace.

San Francisco River Riparian Zone Fence Project on Black Bob Allotment, NM

This project enhanced ~ 220 acres of the river channel and riparian zone on the San Francisco River through the installation of 3.5 miles of cattle exclosure fencing on the east side of the river and the development of an upland well system. This project is attributed to reducing siltation, trampling of riparian vegetation and excessive nutrient/waste input from cattle, and has improve habitat quality for native fish and other sensitive riparian species.

2014 Projects

Amargosa Canyon Salt Cedar Removal, CA

The Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) supports the only endemic population of the critically endangered Ash Meadows Amargosa Pupfish and the Ash Meadows Speckled Dace in the world. In an effort to address the direct threats of small population size, genetic isolation, and to improve aquatic habitat conditions the Ash Meadows NWR, the Nevada Department of Wildlife, and numerous other partners are working together to restore natural hydrologic connectivity between the Five Springs complex and downstream habitats.

 

This project removed nonnative species and restored the natural historic floods that were hindered by a road and fallow field. This restoration has benefited the Ash Meadows Amargosa Pupfish, the Ash Meadows Speckled Dace, and numerous other plant and animal species by improved fish passage and connectivity through the removal of barriers and impoundments, yielding increased genetic exchange for the pupfish, and increasing the available habitat for both the pupfish and the speckled dace.

Muddy River Streambank Rehabilitation, NV

The Muddy River Ecosystem Recovery project is designed to recover the endemic Moapa dace and other native biodiversity dependent upon the Muddy River in southern Nevada. It is a basin wide recovery effort focused primarily on upstream portions of the river but extending downstream nearly 30 km to Lake Mead. 

Two projects at the Muddy River have been funded in part by the Desert Fish Habitat Partnership: Apcar Culvert Replacement and Muddy River Stream Bank Habitat Rehabilitation. 

 

This project entailed removal of invasive species (Tamarisk and Phragmites) and stream bank restoration utilizing natural stream bank stabilization techniques (bioengineering techniques).

2013 Projects

Moapa Dace Apcar Box Culvert, NV

Apcar Spring is one of 25 thermal source springs for the Muddy (aka Moapa) River in the ‘warm springs’ area of Clark County, Nevada state and historically home to four endangered species. It was originally carpeted with aquatic vegetation but following invasion by non-native Gambusia, Poecilia, andTilapia, had become seriously degraded by the mid-1990s. 

Moapa dace were reintroduced to the system and a stable population developed, but it was separated from additional habitat in lower sections of the system by an under-sized, raised culvert. In 2011 a DFHP team of volunteers installed a much larger box culvert, which allowed the spring to flow freely once more and restored connectivity to an important section of the spring system.

This project was completed in 2013 and now connects vital breeding areas (upstream) with holding areas (downstream) for Moapa dace. The Stream Bank Habitat Rehabilitation project was developed by the Moapa Band of Paiutes (a sovereign tribe) and is a 2014 DFHP project. 

 

Muddy River Stream Bank Stabilization, 

This project enhanced ~ 220 acres of the river channel and riparian zone on the San Francisco River through the installation of 3.5 miles of cattle exclosure fencing on the east side of the river and the development of an upland well system. This project is attributed to reducing siltation, trampling of riparian vegetation and excessive nutrient/waste input from cattle, and has improve habitat quality for native fish and other sensitive riparian species.

Mohave Tui Chub Habitat Restoration- West Pond and Rainbow Wells, CA

The small spring and groundwater-fed ponds at Zzyzx were the last refuge of the endangered Mohave tui chub (Siphateles bicolor mohavensis) after it was extirpated from the Mojave River. Water quality problems led to the loss of habitat in West Pond, leaving only Lake Tuendae. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife restored water quality and re-introduced Mohave tui chub. West Pond now provides habitat for migratory birds. An additional site on Mojave National Preserve, Rainbow Wells, was also stabilized for creating new habitat for Mohave tui chub.

Muddy River Streambank Rehabilitation, NV

The Muddy River Ecosystem Recovery project is designed to recover the endemic Moapa dace and other native biodiversity dependent upon the Muddy River in southern Nevada. It is a basin wide recovery effort focused primarily on upstream portions of the river but extending downstream nearly 30 km to Lake Mead. 

Two projects at the Muddy River have been funded in part by the Desert Fish Habitat Partnership: Apcar Culvert Replacement and Muddy River Stream Bank Habitat Rehabilitation. 

 

This project entailed removal of invasive species (Tamarisk and Phragmites) and stream bank restoration utilizing natural stream bank stabilization techniques (bioengineering techniques).

2012 Projects

Shoshone Pupfish Pond Construction, CA

 Susan Sorrells, a Shoshone resident, has been caring for the Shoshone pupfish living in a small pond on her property for over 30 years. 

A collaborative effort over the past 20 years has resulted in bringing a population of 70 fish, captured in 1986, to well over a thousand today. Since those original 70 fish were relocated to a pond in a remote area of Sorrells’ property, she and others have worked to clear out debris and secure and maintain the flow of the spring that feeds it. Last year, Sorrells noted that the water level was becoming dangerously low and the pond “had been compromised.”​

But “not a moment too soon,” Sorrells says, funding was awarded for a habitat expansion project through the Desert Fish Habitat Partnership. This resulted in the creation of three new pools as backups to the original refugium. This includes a publicly accessible pool that makes general viewing of the Shoshone pupfish possible for the first time.​

Condor Canyon, CA

This project enhanced ~ 220 acres of the river channel and riparian zone on the San Francisco River through the installation of 3.5 miles of cattle exclosure fencing on the east side of the river and the development of an upland well system. This project is attributed to reducing siltation, trampling of riparian vegetation and excessive nutrient/waste input from cattle, and has improve habitat quality for native fish and other sensitive riparian species.

Shoshone Pupfish Pond Construction, NV

The Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) supports the only endemic population of the critically endangered Ash Meadows Amargosa Pupfish and the Ash Meadows Speckled Dace in the world. In an effort to address the direct threats of small population size, genetic isolation, and to improve aquatic habitat conditions the Ash Meadows NWR, the Nevada Department of Wildlife, and numerous other partners are working together to restore natural hydrologic connectivity between the Five Springs complex and downstream habitats.

 

This project removed nonnative species and restored the natural historic floods that were hindered by a road and fallow field. This restoration has benefited the Ash Meadows Amargosa Pupfish, the Ash Meadows Speckled Dace, and numerous other plant and animal species by improved fish passage and connectivity through the removal of barriers and impoundments, yielding increased genetic exchange for the pupfish, and increasing the available habitat for both the pupfish and the speckled dace.